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The Milanese panettone or “big bread,” is cylindrical in shape and crowned with a domed top. The cake dough rises and falls three times before being baked with candied fruit and raisins, although some modern versions feature chocolate too.
Panettone-step-two

Pandoro, or “golden bread,” is a rich yellow colour due to the egg yolks and butter in this Christmas cake from Verona. It’s similar to a sponge cake that’s often dusted with icing sugar and always comes in the shape of a star.
Pandoro-step-one

Both are delicious, but in the end it’s all about personal preference.


Tips and Ideas to Get the Most Out of Your Italian Cake

    • Slicing: Use a serrated knife to cut either cake. A pandoro is traditionally cut horizontally into slices, while panettone is cut vertically into cake-like, triangular wedges (remove the paper liner).

 

    • Both of these cakes can be enjoyed any time of the day.
      • For breakfast: Serve with butter and jam alongside your cup of coffee or tea
      • As a mid-day treat: Serve with a glass of Marsala wine
      • Evening: Serve for dessert with sparkling Moscato

 

    • Pretty presentations
      • Hollow out your panettone by creating a cavity and fill with sweetened whipped cream. Put the top back on and serve to the delight of guests who won’t suspect the sweet filling.

Panettone-step-three

      • Slice pandoro, the star-shaped sweet bread, horizontally and rotate the slices to create a Christmas-tree look. If you want to dress it up, add some whipped mascarpone between the slices and decorate the tips with fresh raspberries.

Pandoro-step-three

 

    • Serving ideas
      • Some like their pandoro served warm with cream or a Nutella spread poured on top.
      • Toast day-old slices of cake, or use them in bread puddings or trifles.
      • Try this savoury application by using either cake in French toast.

 

  • Fun fact: Italian bakers sell 117 million panettone and pandoro cakes a year!

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